Last minute information for remote Sprinters for the Zope Resurrection Sprint

As the Zope Resurrection sprint is approaching, it seems useful to share some information on the schedule for the three days in Halle. As we have also some sprinters, who can not join on site, but might want to join remotely, a few key facts might come in handy.

Etherpad

There is the Etherpad, where the current list of topics is collected. Most of the stories we are going to tackle will be based on this list. In case you have something to add, or are interested in a specific topic in particular, it is a good idea to add your thoughts before the start of the sprint.

IRC Channel

During the sprint we will communicate via the #sprint channel on irc.freenode.net, so additional information and questions can be placed there.

Google Hangout

As the sprint is also intended to foster discussions about the future of Zope, we want to encourage as many people as possible to join. Therefore, we have a hangout where we will meet.

Scheduled Discussions

At the moment we plan the following session:

  • Wednesday 2016-09-28 10:00 CEST, duration 1 h: Introduction to WSGI in Zope 4 by Hanno Schlichting (hannosh) + discussion
  • Wednesday 2016-09-28 14:00 CEST, duration 2 h: Discussion about through-the web (TTW) pattern and the underlying RestrictedPython
  • Thursday 2016-09-29 10:00 CEST, duration 0.5 h: Discussion about the necessity and future of ZTK
  • Friday 2016-09-30 14:00 CEST, duration 1 h: Discussion about the Zope 5

So in case you want to contribute remotely to the sprint, please join us on one of the three ways.

 

Zope in the Python 3 wonderland

A little tale

Once upon the time there was the big mighty Zope II. It was one of the leaders in the Python land. It had mighty features like TTW (trough the web) development and its own object oriented database. Many people liked Zope II and trusted it to be the basis for their personal work and the work of their companies.

After some years Zope II got a son named Zope III. It could have been even mightier and more trustworthy than Zope II. But some people argued that Zope III is too complex and too hard to understand and way too different from Zope II which they knew very well.

New, faster and easier to understand frameworks arose beside Zope II and Zope III and the people began to like the new ones more. After many years of power, Zope became weak. Its name got hated by many people in its country. It even got nearly forgotten.

But there are still the people out in the far away kingdoms who built a complete ecosystem on the shoulders of Zope. They cannot completely change the basis of their work within months or even years. They deserve a perspective even for the Python 3 wonderland which is no longer a vague dream but already a future with wide open doors.

Back in reality

We are here to help Zope to find a new home in the Python 3 land and live there happily a great many years. Therefore we scheduled a Sprint named Zope Resurrection Sprint where we will discuss and code on Zope to get it more Python 3 ready.

The big blocker is currently RestrictedPython which relies on modules which are no longer in the Python 3 standard library. But RestrictedPython is an important part of the TTW security concept, so it has to be rewritten from scratch. Folks who think they do not need TTW in their projects can work on a Zope where RestrictedPython is optional.

Besides the Python 3 migration of the code the contents of the application databases using Zope need a conversion, too. On a previous sprint in Berlin, we wrote a possible solution: zodb.py3migrate which needs some more tests with real databases.

Furthermore, there is Zope IV, the successor of Zope II which needs some love to become strong and ready for its adventurous journey as the basis of Plone VI and others.

It is still possible to join the sprint either in Halle (Saale), Germany or remote. We are looking forward to a good time to put up the banner of Zope in the Python land again.

zodb.py3migrate: Migrate an existing ZODB Data.fs to be used with Python 3

At Berlin Strategic sprint 2016 we developed a tool to analyze a ZODB Filestorage to find Python 2 string objects. If they are in an encoding besides ASCII this is preventing using this Filestorage with Python 3 because of decoding errors arising on loading the pickles.
The tool is even able to convert those strings either to unicode by decoding them using a configurable encoding or convert them to zodbpickle.binary so Python 3 will read them as bytes.
There is documentation of the tool and a repository on GitHub where the code lives.

There are still some questions open:

  • Is there already another tool for this analysis/migration?
  • Is there already any practical knowledge migrating Filestorage contents to Python 3?
  • Do you think such a tool is the right approach to achieve such a migration?
  • Is there anyone who wants to try out the tool on a Filestorage of a personal project and share the experiences? (We analyzed two projects where we have access to a Filestorage but we are sure this does not catch all the edge cases.)

Florian Pilz

Today’s blogpost is all about me. I joined gocept about a year ago, therefore I want to tell you something about the past – and something about the future.

The Past

Florian Pilz

Before joining the gocept crew, I studied computing at the HTWK in Leipzig for 6 years. Since sitting in a german university was not enough for me, I reached out to study in the UK for the best time of a year. This way I came to the University of Bolton near Manchester, where – most importantly – I learned to speak English fluently.

During my time in the UK I started to look into Ruby on Rails and earned my first salaries. This was the point were I switched my Linux PC for a Mac. Since I already was comfortable with Windows and Linux I wanted to try out the last big operation system out there. But as many before me, I liked the Mac so much that I still use it as my development machine.

Back in Germany I continued to earn some money on the side working with Ruby on Rails. I really enjoyed using Ruby and I think in terms of readability it’s ahead of most other programming languages by several magnitudes. But Ruby also has its shortcomings, which I did not recognize until I switched to Python as my main programming language here at gocept.

I also did some very interesting projects during my studies, here are just three of them:

  • An OCR software which recognizes mathematical symbols. The idea was to integrate it into the Leibniz-project to make it possible for blind people to read mathematical school books.
  • An iPhone app that helps developers and freelancers to get better at estimating how long it takes to implement a feature or project.
  • A scientific article about software estimation that was actually published in print!

After I finished my master thesis, I had the opportunity to go on a 2-month vacation with my wife. So we took two backpacks and travelled around the entire US. A memory I will feast on my entire life. You can get some impressions on my flickr fotostream.

The Future

During the last year at gocept, I dove into the code base of two of our biggest clients – DGB and Ver.di – and helped improving their CMS. Currently I am getting in touch with the code base of Zeit Online, since a colleague will move to the upper floor, where our admins are situated.

But most importantly, you will see me more often around here, since I will be writing about things we do and learn here at gocept during the following months. I already have some topics on my desk which are worth a blogpost. For example, why hg rebase can be harmful, why testing AJAX using Jasmine is a pain, the benefits of a headless browser like PhantomJS and many more.

Next up will be a post about something we did at the summer sprint, which includes an Arduino, an LED strip and a failing test server.

Running tests using gocept.selenium on Travis-CI

Travis-CI is a free hosted continuous integration platform for the open source community. It has a good integration with Github, so each push to a project runs the tests  of the project.

gocept.selenium is a python package our company has developed as a test-friendly Python API for Selenium which allows to run tests in a browser.

Travis-CI uses YML-Files to configure the test run. I found only little documentation how to run Selenium tests on Travis-CI. But it is straight forward. The following YML file I took from a personal project of mine. (I simplified it a bit for this blog post.):

language: python
python:
  - 2.6
before_install:
  - "export DISPLAY=:99.0"
  - "sh -e /etc/init.d/xvfb start"
  - "wget http://selenium.googlecode.com/files/selenium-server-standalone-2.31.0.jar"
  - "java -jar selenium-server-standalone-2.31.0.jar &"
  - "export GOCEPT_SELENIUM_BROWSER='*firefox'"
install:
  - python bootstrap.py
  - bin/buildout
script:
  - bin/test

Explanation:

  • Lines 1 – 4: My project is a Python project which currently only runs on Python 2.6. But other Python versions will work as well.
  • Lines 5, 6: Firefox needs a running XServer, so we start it first as it takes some seconds to launch. See Travis-CI documentation, too.
  • Lines  7, 8: The Selenium server seems not to be installed by default, so get it and launch it.
  • Line 9: Tell gocept.selenium to use Firefox to run the tests. (Note: To use the new Webdriver-API in the upcoming version 2 of gocept.selenium you have to set other environment variables.)
  • Lines 10 – 14: Install the project and run the tests as usual. (The example uses zc.buildout to do this.)

Note: Although I use the Firefox which is installed by default on the Travis-CI machine, I did not yet find out which version it is.

neu@gocept.com

gravGestatten, Stefan Walluhn mein Name – neustes Mitglied der gocept Crew. Seit vielen Jahren bin ich im Unix/Linux-Umfeld als Systemadministrator und Programmierer tätig. Bisher habe ich in erster Linie für kulturellen Zusammenhängen gearbeitet. Über lange Zeit betreute ich die IT des freien Radio Corax in Halle (Saale). Ebenfalls in Halle war ich an der Gründung des Vereins Terminal.21 e.V. beteiligt, der sich zum Ziel gesetzt hat, moderne Technologien für soziale und kulturelle Projekte verfügbar zu machen. Im Rahmen des Vereins gebe ich Schulungen und Workshops zu IT-Themen. Gemeinsam betreiben wir eine mobile IT-Ausstattung zu Festivals und Großevents. Im Jahr 2011 eröffnete Terminal.21 einen lokalen Hackerspace und versucht seither, die IT-Szene der Stadt zu vernetzen.

Seit Mitte November verstärke ich das Team von gocept. Zusammen mit den „alten Hasen“ kümmere ich mich als Administrator um Server und Netzwerk. Gemeinsam sorgen wir für einen stabilen Betrieb der Dienste, finden auftretende Fehler und erdenken solide Lösungen.

Gleich nach meinem Einstieg hatte ich die Gelegenheit, mit allen gocept Mitarbeitern zum Sprint an die Ostsee zu fahren. Zum einen konnte ich das Team auf sehr angenehme Weise kennenlernen, zum anderen hatten wir Zeit in Ruhe gemeinsam zu arbeiten. Während die Entwickler mit verschiedenen JavaScript-Bibliotheken experimentierten haben sich die Admins Ceph, ein verteiltes Dateisystem, angesehen und dessen Einsatz bei gocept evaluiert. Neben ersten Aufgaben im Tagesgeschäft erwartet mich mit Ceph ein größeres Projekt. Ich bleibe gespannt und freue mich auf eine weiterhin interessante Tätigkeit als Administrator bei gocept.