Sprint fruits: gocept.exttest and gocept.package

The whole company spent three days in Kloster Drübeck sprinting on internal tools and topics.

We overhauled our workflow for generating invoices and identified steps that we could automate.

We polished and released gocept.exttest, which integrates for example JavaScript unittest to Python’s unittest framework. In a nutshell, it allows you to write JS tests like this:

require 'my_app.js'

describe 'MyApp', ->
  it 'has read Douglas Adams', ->
  expect(new MyApp().calculate_the_answer()).toEqual(42)

and include them into your Python test suite with a single command:

import gocept.exttest
def test_suite():
    return gocept.exttest.makeSuite(
        os.environ.get('jasmine-bin'),
        '--coffee',
        '--json',
        pkg_resources.resource_filename('your.package', 'tests'))

The third area of our efforts was documentation, we designed a Sphinx skeleton to make it easy to get started writing docs, and created a template for eggs that contains the necessary boilerplate and codifies our packaging and documentation conventions. While the concrete details are probably a bit specific to our tastes, some of the general mechanincs might be interesting to others, so we’ll release gocept.package once we’ve got the missing integration tests sorted out.

Shutting down an HTTPServer

For integration tests it can be helpful to have a fake HTTP server whose behaviour the tests can control. All necessary building blocks are even included in Python standard library. However, the BaseHTTPServer is surprisingly hard to shut down properly, so that it gives up the socket and everything.

While working on gocept.selenium, we came up with some code that does the trick (together with Jan-Wijbrand Kolman and Jan-Jaap Driessen).

class HTTPServer(BaseHTTPServer.HTTPServer):

    _continue = True

    def serve_until_shutdown(self):
        while self._continue:
            self.handle_request()

    def shutdown(self):
        self._continue = False
        # We fire a last request at the server in order to take it out of the
        # while loop in `self.serve_until_shutdown`.
        try:
            urllib2.urlopen(
                'http://%s:%s/' % (self.server_name, self.server_port))
        except urllib2.URLError:
            # If the server is already shut down, we receive a socket error,
            # which we ignore.
            pass
        self.server_close()

You might use this in a zope.testrunner layer like this:

class SilentRequestHandler(BaseHTTPServer.BaseHTTPRequestHandler):

    def log_message(self, format, *args):
        pass


class HTTPServerLayer(object):

    host = 'localhost'

    def setUp(self):
        self.server = None
        self.port = random.randint(30000, 40000)
        self.start_server()

    def start_server(self):
        self.server = HTTPServer((self.host, self.port), SilentRequestHandler)
        self.server_thread = threading.Thread(
            target=self.server.serve_until_shutdown)
        self.server_thread.daemon = True
        self.server_thread.start()
        # Kludge: Wait a little as it sometimes takes a while to get the server
        # started.
        time.sleep(0.25)

    def stop_server(self):
        if self.server is None:
            return
        self.server.shutdown()
        self.server_thread.join()

    def tearDown(self):
        self.stop_server()

 

 

Get a zc.sourcefactory to implement an interface

zc.sourcefactory is very handy to easily create a source (zope.schema.interfaces.IIterableSource to be precise) with corresponding titles and tokens for its contents. Every now and then a source requires an explicit interface. For zc.sourcefactory the following code snippet helps:

class IMySource(zope.schema.interfaces.IIterableSource):
    """my source"""

class MySource(
    zc.sourcefactory.contextual.BasicContextualSourceFactory):
    """The source factory."""

    class source_class(
        zc.sourcefactory.source.FactoredContextualSource):
        """This class is being instanciated by the factory.

        It *must* be called source_class.
        """
        zope.interface.implements(IMySource)

    def getValues(self, context):
        …

Of course it is also possible to declare the source_class separately from the source factory and reference it. But since its sole purpose is to hold an implements declaration, I’m fine with defining it inline.